Kekoolani Genealogy of the Descendants of the Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii


Kalokuokamaile (Ka-loku-o-kamaile) (Ali'i-o-Hana, Ali'i-o-Kipahulu, Ali'i-o-Kaupo) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 was born in 1760. He married 7 Kealohikanakamaika (Kahikikala-o-kalani, Ke'alohi, i Kealohi-kanaka-maikai) (Maui Chiefess).

Other marriages:
Kaloiokalani (Ka-loi-a-kalani),

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His marriages include a union with his own mother Kahikikalakalanilehua (Kalanilehua, Kahikikala), the Ruling Chiefess of Hana, Kipahulu and Kaupo. This mother-son naha pio or "ho'i" union was meant to increase the rank of his offspring, the chief Kukahikapaua.

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SHORT BIOGRAPHY

Kalokuokamaile (meaning "downpour/blowing of the maile" in Hawaiian), was a Hawaiian chief and first-born son of Keoua Kalanikupuapaikalaninui and half-brother of Kamehameha the Great who unified the Hawaiian Islands in 1810.

He was born on the island of Maui. His mother was the the High Chiefess Kahikikalaokalani ruler of Hana, Kipahulu and Kaupo. He was Keoua's firstborn son and was deemed "Ka Keiki o Kona wa Heuole," which means the offspring of his beardless youth. At age three his father return to his ancestral home on the Big Island of Hawaii and left Kalokuokamaile to be raised by his mother.."

Years passed and he grew up to be a strong athletic man, of good and mild nature, with no selfish or ambitious motives. His single aim was to secure the happiness and contentment of his people. His mother had died and now he was the ruler of the kingdom in her stead.

He had taken a wife from the neighboring district of Kahikinui and Honuaula, ruled over by a chiefly family of which Kaloiokalani was the only flower. Tiding of her fine qualities had reached Hana. He set out to visit that court and he had to observe th kapu of his family, paying his visits by night. He was happily received by the parents and soon arrangements for the royal nupitals were completed. When the hoao (wedding) had taken place and feasting and dancing ended, Kalokuokamaile made preparations to return to Hana. As Kaloiokalani was a great favorite with her people, the makaaina volunteered to get up a great cavalcade to escort the distinguished couple as far as Kipahulu District. It was said in legends that, so immense was the throng, the procession was mistaken for an invasion by some unknown enemy. However Kalokuokamaile was at last settled at the old family homestead and affairs ran smoothly and lovely.

A bright little girl soon appeared on the scene. They named her Kaohelelani, and she was fated to be their only child. She was verging into maidenhood when he died. His people showed their affectionate regard for him by making his grave on the highest peak of their country, Kauwiki. Upon news of his death reaching his brother Kamehameha I, he decided to take his fatherless niece into his court and for their brother Kealiimaikai to temporalily hold Kaohelelani's land inheritances until she reach majority. Kamehameha conquered Kalanikupule, King of Maui, and partition out, to the chiefs who had aided him, the land that was the rightful ingeritance of his niece.
[edit]References

REF:
(1) Pratt, Elizabeth K. (March 27, 2000). Keoua : Father of Kings . Ke Ali'i Pub. Page 15-17
(2) Pratt, Elizabeth K. (March 27, 2000). Keoua : Father of Kings . Ke Ali'i Pub. Page 43-44

Kealohikanakamaika (Kahikikala-o-kalani, Ke'alohi, i Kealohi-kanaka-maikai) (Maui Chiefess) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 was born about 1738. She married 7 Kalokuokamaile (Ka-loku-o-kamaile) (Ali'i-o-Hana, Ali'i-o-Kipahulu, Ali'i-o-Kaupo). She had other parents.

Other marriages:
Keoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui (Keaoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui),
Kaneiahaka (Kane-ia-haka, Kauikapuaauwaapanaole, Kauikapua),

Ruling Chiefess of Hana, Kipahulu and Kaupo

Called "Kahikika" when the wife of Keoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui (Keaoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui) - BIG ISLAND

Called "Kealohikanakamaikai" or "Kealohi" when the wife of /Kaneiahaka (Kane-ia-haka, Kauikapuaauwaapanaole, Kauikapua) - KAUAI

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ABOUT KAHIKIKA
("Kealohikanakamaikai" or "Kealohi" is the name she was known by on Kauai. - Dean Kekoolani)

For whom the kapu, "Kapu Poo Hoolewa I kala" or "He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu" from her mother the sacred ninaupi'o chiefess Kalanikuiokikilo also known as Kalani Kaumehameha, because she was the daughter of Kamehamehanui Ailua, King of Maui.

AS Kalakuokamaile's mother.

FROM History of Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui (By Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt):

"Comely of person and gracious to all he met, Keoua as he verged toward manhood became an attractive personage. While yet awaiting the fulfilment of the plighted troth of his childhood, rumors of events in Maui royal circles were wafted across the waters of Alenuihaha channel which stirred his ambition. They were of the two beautiful daughters of Kalahumoku and his wife Kalani Kaumehameha. Kalahumoku was the reigning high chief of all Hana including also the districts of Kipahulu and Kaupo, whose decease had just taken place, his eldest daughter Kahikikala assuming the right of successorship in governing his people. Kalahumoku was a lineal descendant of Loe, the great progenitor of Maui's chiefdom, the Piilanis, Kamalalawalu and others, and of the Hana aliis as well.

This family possessed a wonderful tabu entirely different from, and never known to exist among, any of the other chief families of the Hawaiian group. It was styled "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La," and inherited from Kaakaualaninui, the grandmother of Kalahumoku. It signified the laying of the head toward the sun's position in the heavens from its rising unto its setting. Days for the observance of this tabu were strictly kept. The only time for recreation during the tabu must be taken from between the setting of the luminary and the dawn of a new day."

NOTE ON ABOVE (from DEAN P. KEKOOLANI) : The kapu "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La" is inherited from the mother, the chiefess Kaumehameha, who was also known as Kalanikuaiokikilo. This kapu was not inherited from the father Kalahumoku or the father's family as suggested by the above story. Please see the note in the record for Kalanikauiokikilo (Kalani Kaumehameha).

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In her "Hawaiian Genealogies" collection, Mary Pukui discovered the following alternate genealogy for Lonoikahaupu (no gender given where not indicated):

(1) Koi-hala-hua to Kalani-laha-kiki had Ho'oka-poki'i
(2) Ho'oka-poki'i to Makua had Pilliani
(3) Piilani to Hinakohila has Lonokauakini
(4) Lonokauakini to Kapukaheiao had Lono-i-ka-ha'upu
(5) Lono-i-ka-ha'upu to Kalanakauleleiaiwi had Keawepoepoe

NOTES by Dean Kekoolani:

Regarding above #1:
The name Kalani-laha-kiki in this general area of the lineage supports the idea that the chiefess who is most frequently referred to as Ke-'alohi (Kealohikanakamaikai, Kealohi-kanaka-maikai) on the Kauai registers is also the Kahikikala, Maui Chiefess.

Regarding above #2:
This PIiliani is not the same as the Ruler of Hawaii. This Piilani is 3 generations later and is "Piilani II".

We do include this intriguing alternate genealogy for Kauai in our database, but we do not go so far as to actually connect Lonokauakini to Lono-i-ka-ha'upu. However, this genealogy deserves further investigation and analysis.

They had the following children:

  M i Kukahikapaua.

Kaneiahaka (Kane-ia-haka, Kauikapuaauwaapanaole, Kauikapua) [Parents] 1, 2. married 3, 4 Kealohikanakamaika (Kahikikala-o-kalani, Ke'alohi, i Kealohi-kanaka-maikai) (Maui Chiefess).

Called "Kauikapuaauwaapanaole" and "Kauikapua" in the Kuikahi Family Genealogy.

Kealohikanakamaika (Kahikikala-o-kalani, Ke'alohi, i Kealohi-kanaka-maikai) (Maui Chiefess) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 was born about 1738. She married 7, 8 Kaneiahaka (Kane-ia-haka, Kauikapuaauwaapanaole, Kauikapua). She had other parents.

Other marriages:
Keoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui (Keaoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui),
Kalokuokamaile (Ka-loku-o-kamaile), (Ali'i-o-Hana, Ali'i-o-Kipahulu, Ali'i-o-Kaupo)

Ruling Chiefess of Hana, Kipahulu and Kaupo

Called "Kahikika" when the wife of Keoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui (Keaoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui) - BIG ISLAND

Called "Kealohikanakamaikai" or "Kealohi" when the wife of /Kaneiahaka (Kane-ia-haka, Kauikapuaauwaapanaole, Kauikapua) - KAUAI

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ABOUT KAHIKIKA
("Kealohikanakamaikai" or "Kealohi" is the name she was known by on Kauai. - Dean Kekoolani)

For whom the kapu, "Kapu Poo Hoolewa I kala" or "He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu" from her mother the sacred ninaupi'o chiefess Kalanikuiokikilo also known as Kalani Kaumehameha, because she was the daughter of Kamehamehanui Ailua, King of Maui.

AS Kalakuokamaile's mother.

FROM History of Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui (By Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt):

"Comely of person and gracious to all he met, Keoua as he verged toward manhood became an attractive personage. While yet awaiting the fulfilment of the plighted troth of his childhood, rumors of events in Maui royal circles were wafted across the waters of Alenuihaha channel which stirred his ambition. They were of the two beautiful daughters of Kalahumoku and his wife Kalani Kaumehameha. Kalahumoku was the reigning high chief of all Hana including also the districts of Kipahulu and Kaupo, whose decease had just taken place, his eldest daughter Kahikikala assuming the right of successorship in governing his people. Kalahumoku was a lineal descendant of Loe, the great progenitor of Maui's chiefdom, the Piilanis, Kamalalawalu and others, and of the Hana aliis as well.

This family possessed a wonderful tabu entirely different from, and never known to exist among, any of the other chief families of the Hawaiian group. It was styled "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La," and inherited from Kaakaualaninui, the grandmother of Kalahumoku. It signified the laying of the head toward the sun's position in the heavens from its rising unto its setting. Days for the observance of this tabu were strictly kept. The only time for recreation during the tabu must be taken from between the setting of the luminary and the dawn of a new day."

NOTE ON ABOVE (from DEAN P. KEKOOLANI) : The kapu "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La" is inherited from the mother, the chiefess Kaumehameha, who was also known as Kalanikuaiokikilo. This kapu was not inherited from the father Kalahumoku or the father's family as suggested by the above story. Please see the note in the record for Kalanikauiokikilo (Kalani Kaumehameha).

-----------------------------------------------
In her "Hawaiian Genealogies" collection, Mary Pukui discovered the following alternate genealogy for Lonoikahaupu (no gender given where not indicated):

(1) Koi-hala-hua to Kalani-laha-kiki had Ho'oka-poki'i
(2) Ho'oka-poki'i to Makua had Pilliani
(3) Piilani to Hinakohila has Lonokauakini
(4) Lonokauakini to Kapukaheiao had Lono-i-ka-ha'upu
(5) Lono-i-ka-ha'upu to Kalanakauleleiaiwi had Keawepoepoe

NOTES by Dean Kekoolani:

Regarding above #1:
The name Kalani-laha-kiki in this general area of the lineage supports the idea that the chiefess who is most frequently referred to as Ke-'alohi (Kealohikanakamaikai, Kealohi-kanaka-maikai) on the Kauai registers is also the Kahikikala, Maui Chiefess.

Regarding above #2:
This PIiliani is not the same as the Ruler of Hawaii. This Piilani is 3 generations later and is "Piilani II".

We do include this intriguing alternate genealogy for Kauai in our database, but we do not go so far as to actually connect Lonokauakini to Lono-i-ka-ha'upu. However, this genealogy deserves further investigation and analysis.

They had the following children:

  M i Kauakahilau (Ka-ua-kahi-lau, Lono-ka-ua-kini).
  F ii Kealohi-a-piikoa 1.
  F iii Kapulauki (Ka-pū-lau-ki) (Kauai Chiefess).
  F iv Kealohikiikaupea (Kealohikiikaupea II, Kealohikiikaupea-a-Kahikikala).

Palikua (Alii-o-Koloa). married Kapuaamohu (Kawalu Kapuaamohu).

Kapuaamohu (Kawalu Kapuaamohu) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 died on 5 Jun 1832 in Manoa Valley, Oahu. She married Palikua (Alii-o-Koloa).

Other marriages:
Kaumualii (Ka-umu-aliʻi), H.M. George (King of Kauai and Niihau)

They had the following children:

  F i Akahi-a-Kuwala (Akahi, Akahinui) (Kauai Chiefess) was born in 1746.
  F ii H.M. Queen Kaapuwai Kapua'amohu (Ka-'apu'wai, Kaapuwai II, Kapuaamohu).

Kamanawa (Kamanawa I) [Parents] 1, 2. married Kekuiapoiwa (Kekuiapoiwa II) (Kekuiapoiwa-a-Ha'ae).

Other marriages:
Kekelakekeaokalani II (Kekela, Kekelaokalani, Kekelakekeaokalani-o-Kauakahiakua),
Kaehukielei,

Kameeiamoku and Kamanawana were twins. They are pictured on the Great Seal of Hawaii. They were supporters of Kamehameha's rise to power, along with their half-brother Keeaumoku Papaiahiahi and another chief, Keawe-a-Heulu (ancestor of queen Liliuokalani and Kalakaua).

Kekuiapoiwa (Kekuiapoiwa II) (Kekuiapoiwa-a-Ha'ae) [Parents] 1.(Kekuiapoiwa-a-Ha'ae) married Kamanawa (Kamanawa I).

Other marriages:
Keoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui (Keaoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui),


"The Complete Ancestry of John Liwai Kalniopuuikapali-o-Molilele-ma-wai-o-Ahukini-Kau-Hawaii Ena":
Keaouakalanikupuapaikalaninui (k) married Kekuiapoiwa II, chief of Kona, Hawaii, no issue.

Keaouakalanikupuapaikalaninui is not the biological father of Kamehameha.

"The Complete Ancestry of John Liwai Kalniopuuikapali-o-Molilele-ma-wai-o-Ahukini-Kau-Hawaii Ena":
Kalaninuiamamao (k) married Kamakaimoku (w) and was born Kalaniopuu (k) King of Hawaii, Ka'u, Puna, and Kona, and was born Keaouakalanikupuapaikalaninui (k), father of Kamehameha I, but Kamehameha was not by him; Keaoua was married for seven years to his chiefly wife, but he did not have a child so Keaweaheulu (k), Kameeiamoku (k), Kamanawa (k) got Kahekiliahumanu (k), King of Maui, to come to Hawaii where Kekuiapoiwa was living and in this mating had that child, a famous conqueror, the seeker of chiefs, leader of the chiefs and in that did the chiefs increase.


Ha'ae (Haae-o-Kalani, Haaeokalani, Ha'ae-a-Mahi) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 died in 1802. He married Kekelakekeaokalani I (Kekela, Kekelakekeaokalani-o-Keawe).

Other marriages:
Kalelemauli (Ka-lele-mauli, Kalelemauliokalani),

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

Look at the children of Kaianikauleleiaiwi: (1) Child No. 1, Kekuiapoiwanui I (w); (2) Kekelaokekeaokalani (w); (3) Kalanikeeaumoku (k); (4) Alapainui (k), King of Hawaii, ancestor of L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko and many other offsprings; (5) Haae (k); (6) Keawepoepoe (k).

Kalanikauleleiaiwi (w) married again, to Kauauanuiamahiololi (k); born was Alapainui, King of Hawaii, ancestor of Kekaaniau, chiefess, L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko, Sam Parker and his sister Mary Stillman, and Kameeualani Kauanoe; and Haae, Alapai's younger brother, was also born of this union.

Kekelakekeaokalani I (Kekela, Kekelakekeaokalani-o-Keawe) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 was born in 1710. She married Ha'ae (Haae-o-Kalani, Haaeokalani, Ha'ae-a-Mahi).

S.L.K. Peleioholani says her name is Kekelakekeaokalani.

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

Look at the children of Kaianikauleleiaiwi: (1) Child No. 1, Kekuiapoiwanui I (w); (2) Kekelaokekeaokalani (w); (3) Kalanikeeaumoku (k); (4) Alapainui (k), King of Hawaii, ancestor of L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko and many other offsprings; (5) Haae (k); (6) Keawepoepoe (k).

Kalanikauleleiaiwi (w) married again, to Keawe (k), King of Hawaii, and were born Kekelakekeaokaiani (w) and Kaianikeaumoku (k).

Kekela is the name given in Ka Nonanona newspaper (1842)

They had the following children:

  F i Kekuiapoiwa (Kekuiapoiwa II) (Kekuiapoiwa-a-Ha'ae).

Kameeiamoku (Kameeiamoku I, Kame'eiamoku, Kukahi) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. married 10 Kamaka'eheukuli (Kamakaeheikuli).

Other marriages:
Puhipuhiili (Puhipuhi'ili),
Keliiokahekili (Kelii-o-kahekili),
Kahikoloa (Kala-Hooano-o-nalani-o-Kahikoloa, Kalaolani, Kalaolani-kahikiola),
Kauhilanahonua,
Unknown

Counsellor of State to King Kamehameha I the Great

Kameeiamoku and Kamanawana were twin brothers. They are pictured on the Great Seal of Hawaii. They were supporters of Kamehameha's rise to power, along with their half-brother Keeaumoku Papaiahiahi and another chief, Keawe-a-Heulu (ancestor of queen Liliuokalani and Kalakaua).

Kukahi is the name given in Ka Poe Pili Oiaia Ia Kahikoloa.

Kamaka'eheukuli (Kamakaeheikuli) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 was born in 1740. She married 7 Kameeiamoku (Kameeiamoku I, Kame'eiamoku, Kukahi).

Other marriages:
Keoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui (Keaoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui),
Kaoo (kane),

Mother of Kalaimamahu.

They had the following children:

  M i Kepookalani (Kepookalani I, Kepooakamoku, Kepo-o-kalani) (Ali'i-o-Kauai).
  F ii Kekikipa'a (Kekikipa'a-a-Kameeiamoku, Nowelo-Kauhi-Kiki-a-Pa'a).

Kaoo (kane) [Parents]. married Kamaka'eheukuli (Kamakaeheikuli).

Prime Minister for Kalaniopu'u.

Kamaka'eheukuli (Kamakaeheikuli) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 was born in 1740. She married Kaoo (kane).

Other marriages:
Keoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui (Keaoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui),
Kameeiamoku (Kameeiamoku I, Kame'eiamoku, Kukahi),

Mother of Kalaimamahu.

They had the following children:

  F i Kalailua.

Ha'ae (Haae-o-Kalani, Haaeokalani, Ha'ae-a-Mahi) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 died in 1802. He married 6 Kalelemauli (Ka-lele-mauli, Kalelemauliokalani).

Other marriages:
Kekelakekeaokalani I (Kekela, Kekelakekeaokalani-o-Keawe),

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

Look at the children of Kaianikauleleiaiwi: (1) Child No. 1, Kekuiapoiwanui I (w); (2) Kekelaokekeaokalani (w); (3) Kalanikeeaumoku (k); (4) Alapainui (k), King of Hawaii, ancestor of L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko and many other offsprings; (5) Haae (k); (6) Keawepoepoe (k).

Kalanikauleleiaiwi (w) married again, to Kauauanuiamahiololi (k); born was Alapainui, King of Hawaii, ancestor of Kekaaniau, chiefess, L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko, Sam Parker and his sister Mary Stillman, and Kameeualani Kauanoe; and Haae, Alapai's younger brother, was also born of this union.

Kalelemauli (Ka-lele-mauli, Kalelemauliokalani) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4. married 5 Ha'ae (Haae-o-Kalani, Haaeokalani, Ha'ae-a-Mahi).

They had the following children:

  F i Kamaka'eheukuli (Kamakaeheikuli) was born in 1740.
  F ii Ha'alou (Ha'alou I, Haalou Nui, Haalou-a-Ha'ae, Naalou).
  F iii Kauhilanahonua.

Kamehameha I the Great (Paiea Kūnuiakea Kamehameha) (King of Hawaii) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born in Nov 1737 in Pahoehoe, Maui. He died on 8 May 1819 in Kailua, Kona, Hawaii Island. He married Liliha Kekuiapoiwa (Kekuiapoiwa III). He was related to his parents by adoption. He had other parents.

Other marriages:
Kekuaipiia (Ke-kua-i-pi'ia, Namahana-o-Pi'ia) ), Lydia Liliha (Queen of Hawaii)
Peleuli (Peleuli-i-Kekela-o-kalani), (Queen of Hawaii)
Kaahamanu, (Elizabeth Kaʻahumanu) (Queen of Hawaii)
Kaheiheimalie, (Kaheiheimālie, Kalākua Kaheiheimālie, Hoapili Wahine) (Queen of Hawaii)
Keopuolani (Kalanikauikaʻalaneo Kai Keōpūolani), (Queen Consort of Hawaii, Ninaupi'o)
Kahakuha'akoi Wahini-pio (Kahakuhaakoi),
Kekauluohi (Kekāuluohi, Kekā-ulu-ohi), Miriam Auhea
Manono (Manono II),
Ka'aikumoku (Ka'aikumoku I),
Keoua (Keoua-wahine, Keoua-o-Kauhiwawaeono),
Kanekapolei (Kanekapolei I, Kahulilanimaka, Kanekapoleikauila),
Kalola-a-Kumuko'a,
Kekikipa'a (Kekikipa'a-a-Kameeiamoku, Nowelo-Kauhi-Kiki-a-Pa'a),
Kauhilanimaka,


FULL NAME:
Kalani Paiʻea Wohi o Kaleikini Kealiʻikui Kamehameha o ʻIolani i Kaiwikapu kaui Ka Liholiho Kūnuiākea.

THE IDENTITY OF THE BIOLOGICAL PARENTS OF KAMEHAMEHA THE GREAT is a disputed matter.

Contrary to popular history, there is a strong case to be made that Kamehameha was originally a member of the Maui royal family and that he was transferred to the Big Island and adopted by the ruling chief and his wife. They became his parents of record.

This has not been settled (c. 2010) and probably can't be settled. It doesn't need to be settled. However, there is no question about whom Kamehameha the Great treated as his father, and that was the great chief Keoua Kalani-kupu'uapai-kalani-nui Ahilapalapa. By tradition, the Hawaiian people follow this line of genealogy because Kamehameha himself did. It is probably a good practise. When fully understood, the ancient custom of hanai and the seriousness of it in Hawaiian culture makes clear to those who understand that Keoua was very much indeed Kamehameha's "real" father. All Hawaiians will understand that to be the truth. It is this family of Keoua that formed the royal court around Kamehameha the Great.

However, in our genealogy practise we follow the blood-line tradition from Maui (taught by our kupuna the genealogist SLK Peleioholani), which tells us that Kamehameha was not the natural biological son of Keoua Kalani-kupu'uapai-kalani-nui Ahilapalapa and Kekupoiwa Nui but rather given as a gift to them by his true biological parents from Maui. These biological parents were Kahekili (Ruling Chief of Maui) and his sister Ku, the son and daughter of Kekaulike (Ruling Chief of Maui). This Maui genealogy would make Kamehameha a full NINAU PI'O chief (the mother and father are full blooded brother and sister and children of ruling chief). This was a rare This would have made him the highest ranking male chief, by blood, in all the Hawaiian Islands. It may have been possible, with this exalted chiefl;y rank anbd all its honors and kapus, to assume complete control over all the islands without going to war, based on his bloodline alone. Such male chiefs are rare, the closest living male in Kamehameha's time being Keawemauhili (who possessed certain "intertwined kapus" from birth which were rare but not as exalted as the NINAU PI'O of Kamehameha).

When Kamehameha was gifted in "hanai" by Maui to the Big Island and it's rulers Keoua Kalani-kupu'uapai-kalani-nui Ahilapalapa and Kekupoiwa Nui, the social and political ramifications of Kamehameha's exceptionally high birth rank upon the fortunes and power of Maui's current elites were neutralized, at least for for the time being. This disappearance of the male infant Kamehameha was very convenient for all the othe other male chiefs of Maui, especially Kamehameha's father Kahekili and uncle Kamahemahanui Ailuau (who he was named after).

END OF THE KAMEHAMEHA DYNASTY

There was a controversy at the time of Kalakaua's election as to the quality of his bloodline and whether he was fit to sit on the throne of Hawaii. Also, there was a controversy about the special election itself, which brought him to power. It is now forgotten that there was a great tumult surrounding the elections results. Not everyone supported Kalakaua. People did riot when they heard Kalakaua had won. There were accusations that Kalakaua had cheated his opponent the beloved Queen Emma (widow of King Kamehameha IV) out of a victory with his political machinations. Many chiefs, especially the very old guard, refused their support and would not attend the Kalakaua court. This is now forgotten. But in its time this was a great controversy, a dark cloud that hung over the Kalakaua Dynasty's possession of the throne and some say it is why they could not hold on to it.

Nonetheless,in due time they did establish themselves firmly in the hearts of the people and their claim was secured. The Kamehameha line (and the Keoua line) lost their seniority in regal succession when the Kalakaua Dynasty came to power and legitamized their government by gaining acceptance by the people of Hawaii Nei. The expression of the warm and sincere acceptance by the Hawaiian people can be seen in their love for Queen Liliuokalani and also for the Princess Victoria Kaiulani.

The current heirs of the Kalakaua Dynasty would be the Kawananakoa family.

Liliha Kekuiapoiwa (Kekuiapoiwa III) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4 was born in 1746. She died about 1815 in Ka'u. She married Kamehameha I the Great (Paiea Kūnuiakea Kamehameha) (King of Hawaii). She had other parents.

Other marriages:
Kiwalao (Kiwala'o), (Ali'i-o-Kohala, Ali'i-o-Kona, Ruling Chief of Hawaii Island)

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NOTE: There are extensive notes for this person. Scroll past these notes to go directly to SPOUSE & CHILDREN
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Liliha Kekuipoiwa (Kekuipoiwa III) is the daughter of Kalaniopu'u, not Keaoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui (Keaoua) as commonly taught.

Knowing the true father of Liliha Kekuipoiwa means we can now see that when she married Kiwalao, she was marrying her full brother not her half-brother, as is commonly taught. This their offspring Keopuolani (w.), a full Ninau Pi'o chief, because she is the offspring of a full blooded brother and sister who are themselves the children of ruling chiefs. This is a rare and precious type chief.

Liliha's daughter Keopuolani, would have been considered more than a normal human being: she was a living god walking among mortals (an "akua"). Thus we understand why she was sought after by Kamehameha to be the Royal Queen Mother of his sons, the furture kings (Kamehameha II and Kamehameha III)

The only person of equal rank to Liliha Kekuipoiwa's daughter would have been the Ninau Pio chiefess Kalanikauiokikilo of Maui, a half-sister of Liliha Kekuipoiwa. Kamehameha also sought this chiefess Kalanikauiokikilo as a wife but because of her high station she committed suicide rather than surrender to Kamehameha, who she considered an enemy of Maui (which he had conquered and subdued) and of insufficient chiefly rank to be her mate.

(Kalanikauikikilo was wrong abou Kamehameha's rank, please see his records and the information about his true parent in this database for that separate discussion)

* PLEASE NOTE: Further sanctifying the daughter Keopuolani was the fact that Liliha and Kiwalao's mother Kalola was herself a kind of Pi'o chief, being the product of a marriage between King Kekaulike of Maui and his half-sister Kekuipoiwa Nui.

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LILIHA KEKUIPOIWA: DAUGHTER OF KING KALANIOPU'U
"The Complete Ancestry of John Liwai Kalniopuuikapali-o-Molilele-ma-wai-o-Ahukini-Kau-Hawaii Ena"
(S.L.K. Peleioholani)
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HAWAIIAN:
Kalaniopuu (k), moi, hoao ia Kalola (w), alii kiekie o Maui, hanau o Kiwalao (k) Liliha Kekuiapoiwa (w), a noho moi mahope mai.

ENGLISH:
Kalaniopuu (k), king, married to Kalola (w), high chiefess of Maui; born was Kiwalao (k) Liliha Kekuiapoiwa (w), who later became ruling king.


[And, later in the same genealogy article (below) - D. Kekoolani]


HAWAIIAN:
E nana ia Kalaninuiiamamao (k) oia ponoi ka makua o Moi Kalaniopuu (k) ame kana mau keiki.
(I) Keiki hiapo Kiwalao (k);
(II) Keiki elua Liliha Kekuiapoiwa, o Saua ponoi ke kupuna o Liholiho (k) I, moi o Hawaii, kupuna o Naahienaena (w)/ kupuna o Kauikeaouli (k) moi o Hawaii.
(III). Kalaniopuu (k) ka makuakane ponoi o Kaleipaihala (k)/ ke kupuna ponoi o Kaleleonalani moi a me L. M. Kekupuoh, Keawehawaii (k), Halalo (k), J. Ropikana (k).
(IV) Kalaniopuu (k) ka makuakane o Keaouakuahuula, ke kupuna o na lit Kekaaniau (w) Honolulu, L. M. Kekupuohi, Sam Paka.

ENGLISH:
Look at Kalaninuiiamamao (k); he was the own father of King Kalaniopuu (k) and his children.
(I) The eldest son Kiwalao (k);
(II) Second child Liliha Kekuiapoiwa; they are the true grandparents of Lihoiiho I (k), King of Hawaii, grandparent of Naahienaena (w) and grandparent of Kauikeaouli (k) King of Hawaii.
(III). Kalaniopuu (k)/ the true father of Kaleipaihala (k), the grandfather of Kaleleonalani, Queen, and L. M. Kekupuohi, Keawehawaii (k), Halalo (k), and J. Robinson (k).
(IV) Kalaniopuu (k), the father of Keaouakuahuula, the ancestor of the chiefess Kekaaniau (w) of Honolulu, L. M. Kekupuohi and Sam Parker. The chief Keouakuahuula (k), true ancestor through the mother of Keouakuahuula, namely Kanekapolei (w), of W. Notley, C. K. Notley, K. 0. Notley, M. Notley, all of Waimea, Hawaii.

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CONCLUSION

Textbooks, charts and references should be corrected.

This is the correct genealogy of the Kamehameha Dynasty according to my great grandfather High Chief S.L.K. Peleiholani, senior ranking Chief of the Keawe Lineage of Hawaii along with his sister the Honorable Ululani Liwai (Baker), Governess of Hawaii Island, advisor to the kings Kamehameha IV and Kalakaua.

This is the knowledge handed down by the Maui and Hawaii chiefs who fathered Kamehameha, helped him conquer the islands, or resisted him to defend their own kingship when they could, and finally gave up their women to be his royal wives. These foundational chiefs passed the kokua and the mo'okuauhau in an unbroken chain from father to son, mother to son, directly to S.L.K. Peleioholani, whose grandmother Kahahana sat at Kamehameha the Great's bedside as he was dieing.

- Dean P. Kekoolani
January 23, 2010
Kapolei, Oahu, Hawaii


Keliimaikai (Keali'imaikai, Kalanimalokuloku, Malokuloku, Kalanimalokuloku-i-Kepookalani) [Parents] 1, 2 died on 14 Nov 1809. He married Ki'ilaweau (Ki'ilaweau I, Ki'ilaweau-a-Keoua).

Other marriages:
Kaliko'okalani (Ka-liko-o-kalani),

Ke-lii-maikai Ka-lani-nui-malokuloku-i-ke-kapu. Brother of Kamehameha I. Chief High Priest of 'Io and also High Priest of Kane, according to one tradition.

Ki'ilaweau (Ki'ilaweau I, Ki'ilaweau-a-Keoua) [Parents] 1. married Keliimaikai (Keali'imaikai, Kalanimalokuloku, Malokuloku, Kalanimalokuloku-i-Kepookalani). She had other parents.

There genealogies, some from old Hawaiian language newspapers, which incorrectly teach that the mother of Ki'ilaweau is Manono (Manono I, Manono Nui), the daughter Alapai Nui and Kamakaimoku.

The mother of Ki'ilaweau (Ki'ilaweau I) is Huaimanono, daughter of Kauluonana (k.) and Kalanioumi (Kalani-o-Umi) (w.). Kalanioumi is the daughter of Kaikilanialiiwahineopuna, Ruling Queen of Hawaii.

From S.L.K. Peleioholani (Ancestry of John Ena):

HAWAIIAN:
Kauluonana (k) hoao ia Kalanioumi (w) kaikamahine a Kaikilaninuialiiwahineopuna ekahi me ke kane elua Kanaloakapulehu hanau na Lani Huaimanono (w) kupuna o Kekuaokalani ame Kauakahiheleikaiwi (w) kupuna o Liwai Ena, A. A. Haalelea, L. A. Coney, L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko.

ENGLISH:
Kauluonana (k) married Kalanioumi (w), daughter of Kaikilaninuialiiwahineopuna I with the second husband Kanaloakapulehu; born were the chiefs Huaimanono (w), grandmother of Kekuaokalani and Kauakahiheleikaiwi (w), grandmother of Liwai Ena, A. A. Haalelea, L. A. Coney, and L. M. Kekupuohiokapulikoliko.

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ENGLISH:
Huaimanono (w), grandmother of Kekuaokalaninui, was killed in battle at Kuamoo, Kona, and for whom this name is called upon her grandchild, L. A. Kekuakapuokekuaokalani Coney, and her younger sibling.

Kauluonana (k) married Kalanioumi (w), daughter of Kaikilaninuialiiwahineopuna I with the second husband Kanaloakapulehu; born were the chiefs Huaimanono (w), grandmother of Kekuaokalani and Kauakahiheleikaiwi (w), grandmother of Liwai Ena, A. A. Haalelea, L. A. Coney, and L. M. Kekupuohiokapulikoliko.

They had the following children:

  M i Kekuaokalani (Kekuaokalani I, Kaiwi-Kuamoʻo Kekua-o-kalani) was born in Dec 1819.

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