Kekoolani Genealogy of the Descendants of the Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii


Paumakua (Paumakua-a-Hoohokukalani) (Hawaii Island Paumakua) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born about 1076 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy. He married 6, 7 Manokalililani (Mano-ka-lili-lani).

Called Paumakua by SLK Peleioholani
Called Pao in Kumu Hawaii article (newspaper) published 1835.
Brother-sister marriage is "Pi'o".

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ABOUT THE NAME "PAUMAKUA"

Hawaiian traditions mention three Paumakuas:

(1) HAWAI'I ISLAND PAUMAKUA: "Paumakua-a-Hoohokulani", the son of Hakalanileo (k.) and Hoohokukalani (w.)

(2) MAUI PAUMAKUA: "Paumakua-a-Hua", the son of Hua-nui-i-ka-la-la'ila'i (k.) and Kapoea (w.)

(3) OAHU PAUMAKU: "Paumakua-a-Lonoho'onewa", the son of Pau (k.) and Kapalakuakalani (w.). But instead of being called "Paumakua-a-Pau", he is surnamed after his great-grandfather Lonoho'onewa and is known as "Paumakua-a-Lonoho'onewa". The Oahu chief Lonoho'ohewa was famous as a voyaging chief who he went to Kahiki. Paumakua followed in his ancestor's footsteps and also traveled to Kahiki. So he takes after his forefather Lonoho'onewa, hence, "Paumakua-a-Lonoho'onewa". Six generations after Paumakua, his own descendant Laamaikahiki would also continue the tradition of voyaging and travel to Kahiki. This is the famous Paumakua who was an explorer of places outside the Hawaiian Islands. His achievements and adventures are sometimes appropriated by the chiefs of Maui and Hawaii for their own ancestors who are also named Paumakua.

The two Paumakuas from Maui and Hawaii Island are frequently confused with one another in the Maui and Hawaii genealogies. This is because of technical weakness in the genealogies of Hawaii and Maui. Those genealogies from the southern part of the Hawaiian islands are in general weaker and inferior in quality and accuracy to the genealogies of O'ahu and Kauai in the north. The northern genealogies, which emphasize the Nanaulu and Maweke lineages are older, better maintained, less tampered with and are also generally more internally coherent than the southern genealogies from Maui and Hawaii.

The mixing of Paumakuas by the Maui and Hawaii chiefs is the kind of ambuiguity typical of those southern traditions, which need to always be cross referenced and verfied by the northern traditions, whenever possible.

DEAN KEKOOLANI
January 29, 2010
Kapolei, O'ahu, Hawaii

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SOLOMON L.K. PELEIOHOLANI ON THE PAUMAKUAS

From Genealogy of the Robinson family, and ancient legends and chants of Hawaii:

"Some genealogies give the name of Paumakua's parents Huanuikalani, the father and Kapea, the mother. There were two Paumakuas known in Hawaiian traditions: a Hawaii Paumakua and a Maui Paumakua. The latter was the son of Huanuikalailai. It is said that [there is also] an Oahu Paumakua [who] was born a Kuaaohe in Kailua, Koolaupoko. His [great-grand] father's name was Lonohoonewa. That the voyages of the Oahu Paumaku to foriegn lands, 'and his exploits and adventures promiscuosly ascribed by later legends to Paumakua, the ancestor of Hawaii and Maui chiefs".

[ ] brackets above by DEAN KEKOOLANI

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ABOUT S.M. KAMAKAU AND THE PAUMAKUAS ("TALES & TRADITIONS")
(by Dean Kekoolani)

Two of the chiefs named Paumakuas are frequently mixed up: the Maui Paumakua and The Hawaii Island Paumakua. Both have genealogical ties to the Maui chiefs. But one is explicitely claimed and regarded by all as a Hawaii Island chief and the other a Maui Island chief. But often people still don't know who they are talking about the genealogies and disambiguation become necessary at some point.

S.M. Kamakau himself admits he is not sure which Paumakua he is trying to describe in Part 1 of "Tales & Traditions of People of Old", noting only that he knows the Paumakua he is concerned with can be traced back to Hema through one of his ancestors, the chiefess Mano-ka-lili-lani.

Today, using forensic genealogy techniques, we can calculate that Kamakau was talking about the Hawaii Island Paumakua (Paumakua-a-Hoohokukalani). This Paumakua is 13 generations from Hema through Mano-ka-lili-lani.

The other Paumakua (Paumakua-a-Hua) was the Maui Paumakua and was born two generations earlier, being 11 generations from Hema and is related to the chiefess Mano-ka-lili-lani but is not her direct descendant.

Unfortunately, in the same passage, he also incorrectly attributes the travels of the Oahu Paumakua (Paumakua-a-Lonoho'onewa) to this particular Paumakua.

However, appears to redemm himself later in Part 2 of "Tales & Traditions of People of Old" by giving us a detailed description of the O'ahu Paumakus (Paumakua-a-Lonoho'onewa ) when he discusses the history of chiefs traveling to Kahiki.

So the deficiency Kamakau appears to display in Part 1 is not his fault, but rather due to the construction of the book itself, which was put together from newspaper articles long after Kamakau died. It is unfortunate that the editors of "Tales and Traditions" did not annotate the text to show in Part 1 that Kamakau knew about all the Paumakuas and was aware of who traveled to Kahiki and that this would be addressed in Part 2 later. This lack of explanation is a disservice to S.M. Kamakau. In my opinion, this needs to be corrected by the publishers of future editions with a footnote and not just an entry in the notes section later. It's a minor fix and a fair one to expect.Paumakua-o-Hua is related to the chiefess Mano-ka-lili-lani but is not a direct descendant.

Manokalililani (Mano-ka-lili-lani) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4 was born about 1076 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy. She married 5, 6 Paumakua (Paumakua-a-Hoohokukalani) (Hawaii Island Paumakua).

Mano-ka-lili-lani is the name used by Kamakau.

They had the following children:

  M i Haho (Hoaho) was born about 1098.
  F ii Kauilaanapa (Kauileanapa, Kauilaianapu) was born about 1098.

Palena (Palena I) (Chief) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1120 in Mokae, Hana, Maui. He was buried in Ka-Lua-o-Palena (The Grave of Palena), Kalihi, Oahu. He married 4, 5 Hiilani-Hiileialialia (Hikawai-Nui).

Birthdate is estimate from calculated chronology of the Ulu-Hema Genealogy.

From "The Genealogy of the Robinson Family":
According to tradition, Palena was born at Mokae, Hana, Maui and when he died he was buried at Kalihi, Oahu on land aftwerward called "Ka-Lua-o-Palena" (The grave of Palena).

There is only one son from Palena, according to the ali'i historian and genealogist Solomon L.K. Peleioholani. It is commonly believed that there were two sons born from Palena: Hanala'a-iki and Hanala'a-nui. Our family follows the less popular genealogy that has only one son for Palena (the SLK Peleioholani version). Marriage to Hiilani is brother-sister marriage ("Pi'o").

Hiilani-Hiileialialia (Hikawai-Nui) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1120 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy. She married 4, 5 Palena (Palena I) (Chief).

There is only one son from this marriage, according to the ali'i historian and genealogist Solomon L.K. Peleioholani. It is commonly believed that there were two sons born from Palena: Hanala'a-iki and Hanala'a-nui.

Our family follows the less popular genealogy that has only one son for Palena (the SLK Peleioholani version).

Hiilani-Hiileialialia is the name given by SLK Peleioholani. Hikawai-Nui is the name given by Kamakau.

They had the following children:

  M i Hanalaaiki (Hanala'a-iki) was born about 1142.

Hanalaanui (Hanala'a-nui, Hana) [Parents] 1, 2 was born about 1186 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). He married 3 Mahuialani (Mahui-a-Lani, Mahuia, Mahuie).

Hanala'a-nui is the given by SLK Peleioholani. He is said to be the son of Mauiloa, not Palena. Hana is the name given in Kumu Hawaii (newspaper) 1835

There is only one son from Palena, not twins named Hanala'a-nui and Hanala'a-iki, according to genealogist Solomon L.K. Peleioholani. It is commonly believed that there were two twin sons born from Palena: Hanala'a-iki and Hanala'a-nui.

There is only one son for Palena (the SLK Peleioholani version), which is Hanala'a-iki.

Hanala'a-nui is the son of Mauiloa and teh grandson of Hanala'a-iki.

Mahuialani (Mahui-a-Lani, Mahuia, Mahuie) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1186 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). She married 4 Hanalaanui (Hanala'a-nui, Hana).

Mahui-a-Lani is the name given by the genealogist S.L.K. Peleioholani.
Mahuia is the name given in Kumu Hawaii (newspaper) 1835

They had the following children:

  M i Lanakawai (Lanaikawai, Lonokawai) (Mo'i, Ruler of Hawai'i) was born about 1208.
  F ii Kalohialiiokawai (Kolohialiiokawai) was born about 1208.

Mauiloa [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4 was born about 1164 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy. He married 5 Kuahu'ula (Kuahu'ula I).

Other marriages:
Kauhua,

Kuahu'ula (Kuahu'ula I) [Parents] 1 was born about 1164 in the Mauiloa-Hanalaanui Genealogy (Big Island). She married 2 Mauiloa.

They had the following children:

  M i Hanalaanui (Hanala'a-nui, Hana) was born about 1186.
  F ii Mahuialani (Mahui-a-Lani, Mahuia, Mahuie) was born about 1186.

Lanakawai (Lanaikawai, Lonokawai) (Mo'i, Ruler of Hawai'i) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1208 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). He married 4 Kalohialiiokawai (Kolohialiiokawai).

The genealogist S.L.K. Peleioholani says he was a King of Hawaii and calls him Lanaikawai in the Robinson Family Genealogy.
Lonokawai is the name given in Kumu Hawaii (Newspaper) 1835

Kalohialiiokawai (Kolohialiiokawai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1208 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). She married 4 Lanakawai (Lanaikawai, Lonokawai) (Mo'i, Ruler of Hawai'i).

Kalohialiiokawai is the name given by SLK Peleiholani.
Kolohialiiokawai is the name given in Kumu Hawaii (newspaper) 1835

They had the following children:

  M i La'au was born about 1230.
  F ii Kukamolimaulialoha (Kukamolimolialoha) was born about 1230.

La'au [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1230 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). He married 4 Kukamolimaulialoha (Kukamolimolialoha).

Kukamolimaulialoha (Kukamolimolialoha) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1230 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). She married 4 La'au.

Kukamolimaulialoha is the name used by the genealogist S.L.K. Peleioholani.
Kukamolimolialoha is the given in Kumu Hawaii (newspaper) 1835

They had the following children:

  M i Pili (Pilika'aiea) was born about 1252.
  F ii Hina-a-Auaku (Hinauapu) was born about 1252.

Pili (Pilika'aiea) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1252 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). He married 4 Hina-a-Auaku (Hinauapu).

The story that Pili is a foreign chief from Tahiti is at odds with the genealogies (three sources in agreement) which say he is the grandson of Lanakawai, a Ruling Chief of Hawaii Island. If he were brought from Tahiti, he was returning or his father Laau was in Tahiti for some reason, where he may have been born.

But Pili was not a foriegner. He was Hawaiian.

Hina-a-Auaku (Hinauapu) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1252 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). She married 4 Pili (Pilika'aiea).

Hinaaauaku is the name given by SLK Peleioholani.
Hinauapu is the name given in Kumu Hawaii (newspaper) 1835

They had the following children:

  M i Koa (Ko) was born about 1274.
  F ii Hinaauamai was born about 1274.

Koa (Ko) [Parents] 1, 2 was born about 1274 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). He married 3 Hinaauamai.

Hinaauamai [Parents] 1, 2 was born about 1274 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). She married 3 Koa (Ko).

They had the following children:

  M i Kaloahale (Loe, 'Ole) was born about 1296.
  F ii Hinamaihelii (Hinamailelii) was born about 1296.

Lonoopua 1 was born about 1142. He married 2 Mahuia (Kapukapu).

Mahuia (Kapukapu) 1, 2, 3 was born about 1142 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy. She married 4 Lonoopua.

Other marriages:
Hanalaaiki (Hanala'a-iki),

Kapukapu is the name given by Kamakau.

They had the following children:

  F i Kuahu'ula (Kuahu'ula I) was born about 1164.

Kukahou (Kukohou) (Alii Aimoku Hawaii Island) [Parents] 1, 2 was born about 1318 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). He married 3 Hinaakeuki (Hineuki).

Kukahou is the name given by the genealogiust S.L.K. Peleioholani.

There is an additional generation (Kaniuhi) between Kukahou and Kanipahu in other genealogies. That generation is not in SLK Peleioholani's version of the genealogy. His genealogy goes from Kukahou directly to Kanipahu.

Hinaakeuki (Hineuki) [Parents] 1, 2 was born about 1318 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Big Island). She married 3 Kukahou (Kukohou) (Alii Aimoku Hawaii Island).

Other marriages:
Pokai,

The genealogist S.L.K. Pelioholani calls her Hinaakeuki.

They had the following children:

  M i Kaniuhi was born about 1340.
  M ii Kanipahu (Chief of Hawaii Island) was born about 1340.

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